Deep sea mining a possibility, but could harm tourist industry, warns ministry CEO

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CEO Paula Ma'u (R) and Ta'hirih Fifita Hokafonu. - ‘Olive Tree planting by the Red Sea in Egypt - The purpose for was to contribute to the efforts of biodiversity through planting olive trees at the Peace and Environment Museum or known as the Peace Park. It was also in support of the “Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework and Vision to 2050” for Egypt with suggestion to revisit it after 25 years marking the collective efforts of the member countries. Photo/Facebook
CEO Paula Ma'u (R) and Ta'hirih Fifita Hokafonu. - ‘Olive Tree planting by the Red Sea in Egypt - The purpose for was to contribute to the efforts of biodiversity through planting olive trees at the Peace and Environment Museum or known as the Peace Park. It was also in support of the “Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework and Vision to 2050” for Egypt with suggestion to revisit it after 25 years marking the collective efforts of the member countries. Photo/Facebook

Philip Cass for Kaniva Tonga News | 6 December 2018

Tonga is exploring the possibility of deep sea mining.

However, there have been warnings that mining the seabed could cause environmental problems and could harm Tonga’s whale watching industry.

Paula Ma’u, CEO of the Ministry of Meteorology, Energy, Information, Disaster Management, Environment, Climate Change and Communications, said eight ministries were developing a plan to sustain the ocean around the kingdom.

“We are still at the exploration stage only now as far as deep sea mining is concerned,” Ma’u said.

Read the full article here: Deep sea mining a possibility, but could harm tourist industry, warns ministry CEO.